The telephone conversation by wole soyinka

Other forms Reportage Journalism often takes on a polemical cast in countries in which libel laws are not stringent. Most journalistic literature, however, deserves none of the ill-repute that is associated with its more polemical expressions. Rather, it is a remarkably elastic form, as adaptable to sarcasm and the puncturing of illusions as to reflection, subtle persuasion, and infectious geniality.

The telephone conversation by wole soyinka

The title reveals the fact that two people are talking on the phone, so the beginning of the poem is on a positive note: The man is searching for a house and the land lady has named a considerable price, and the area where it is located is an impartial and not racially prejudiced.

Also the man could enjoy his privacy as the land lady does not live under the same roof.

My Adventures By Wade Frazier. Revised April Introduction. Believing in the Easter Bunny. Learning the Truth about the Easter Bunny. Hitting Rock Bottom and Meeting Dennis Lee. “Telephone Conversation” by Wole Soyinka demonstrates the injustice of a man being judged on the basis of his skin color. However, in this poem, the problem of racism is not expressed in an explicitly angry tone. The poem “Telephone Conversation” by Wole Soyinka depicts a telephone conversation between an African man and a white landlady who has an apartment to rent. The man inquiries for the price and the location of the apartment and, because he does not want to travel there in vain, he confesses that he is black.

There is silence at the other end; silence which the black man thinks is the reluctant result of an inbred sense of politeness.

However he is wrong because when she speaks again, she disregards all formalities and asks him to explain how dark he is.

The man first thinks he has misheard but then realizes that that is not true as she repeats her question with a varying emphasis. Feeling as if he has just been reduced to the status of a machine, similar to the telephone in front of him, and asked to choose which button he is, the man is so disgusted that he can literally smell the stench coming from her deceptive words and see red everywhere around him.

Ironically he is the one who is ashamed by the tense and awkward silence which follows, and asks for clarification thinking sarcastically that the lady was really helpful by giving him options to choose from. He suddenly understands what she is trying to ask, and repeats her question to her stating if she would like him to compare himself with chocolate, dark or light?

She dispassionately answers and his thoughts change as he describes himself as a West African Sepia as it says in his passport.

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The lady remains quite for a while, not wanting to admit to her ignorance, but then she gives in to curiosity and asks what that is. Now the man has had enough of her insensitiveness. But as he senses that she is about to slam the receiver on him, he struggles one last time to make her reconsider, pleading her to at least see for herself; only to have the phone slammed on him.

Wole Soyinka uses two main literary devices to drive home the message of the poem.

The telephone conversation by wole soyinka

The first of the two is imagery. Right at the beginning, the imagery used to describe the mental image the man has of the woman: Then when he hears her question regarding how dark he is, he is so humiliated and angry that he sees red everywhere. The imagery of the huge bus squelching the black tar is symbolic of how the dominant white community treats those belonging to the minor black one.

The next most evident use is that of irony. Also, it seems almost comical that anyone should be so submissive when he has actually committed no mistakes.

On the other hand, the lady is continuously described in positive terms, suggesting that she is of a good breeding and upper class. Also the basis of the woman rejecting to lease her house to the man is because of the prejudiced notion that African Americans are a savage and wild people.Telephone Conversation was a poem concerning the racial discrimination between the Caucasian and African.

In the poem, the poet wanted to rent a house from the landlady originally. However, after he stated that he was African, the conversation turned t.

Quick Answer

Akinwande Oluwole Babatunde Soyinka (Yoruba: Akinwándé Oluwo̩lé Babátúndé S̩óyinká (born 13 July ), known as Wole Soyinka (pronounced [wɔlé ʃójĩŋká]), is a Nigerian playwright, poet and urbanagricultureinitiative.com was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, the first African to be honoured in that category..

Soyinka was born into a Yoruba family in Abeokuta. The poem “Telephone Conversation” by Wole Soyinka depicts a telephone conversation between an African man and a white landlady who has an apartment to rent. The man inquiries for the price and the location of the apartment and, because he does not want to travel there in vain, he confesses that he is black.

The telephone conversation by wole soyinka

SPECIALIZATION - ENGLISH - TEST Directions: Read each item carefully; then choose the letter of the best answer. 1. The first Asian to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature. Pasternak fell in love with Ida Wissotzkaya, a girl from a notable Moscow Jewish family of tea merchants, whose company Wissotzky Tea was the largest tea company in the world.

Pasternak had tutored her in the final class of high school. He helped her prepare for finals. Wole Soyinka’s Telephone Conversation illustrates this perfectly.

The poem is packed with puns, irony and sarcasm. The poem is packed with puns, irony and sarcasm. It’s hard not to imagine that this conversation (or something like it) actually took place.

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